Ballot Status History – Wisconsin Green Party

1996: The Wisconsin Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in November 1996

In Wisconsin in 1996, a party must haved received at least 1% in a statewide race, in either a gubernatorial or presidential race year. However unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Green Presidential candidate Ralph Nader received 28,723 votes (1.31%). His 1.31% surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to qualify for statewide ballot status for two years.


1998: The Wisconsin Green Party retained for statewide ballot status in November 1998

In Wisconsin in 1998, the criteria to retain for statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% in any statewide race. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Jeff Peterson received 31,329 votes (1.9%) for Secretary of State. His 1.9% surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to retain statewide ballot status for two years.


2000: The Wisconsin Green Party retained statewide ballot status in November 2000

In Wisconsin in 2000 the criteria to retain statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% for president. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Green Presidential candidate Ralph Nader received 94,070 votes (3.4%). His 3.4% surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to retain for statewide ballot status for two years.


2002: The Wisconsin Green Party retained statewide ballot status in November 2002

In Wisconsin in 2002 to retain ballot status, a party must receive at least 1% for a statewide office. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Jim Young received 44,111 votes (2.5%) for Governor and Paul Aschenbrenner received 114,955 votes (6.92%) for State Treasurer. Both totals surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to retain its statewide ballot status for two years.


2004: The Wisconsin Green Party failed to extend statewide ballot status in November 2004

In Wisconsin in 2004 the criteria to retain statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% for president. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Green presidential candidate David Cobb received 2,661 votes  (0.09%) less than 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to extend its statewide ballot status for two years.


2006: The Wisconsin Green Party regained statewide ballot status in November 2006

In Wisconsin in 2006, the criteria to gain statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% in any statewide race. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Nelson Eisman/Leon Todd
received 40,709 votes 1.9% for Governor/Lt. Governor; Michael Laforest received 92,587 votes (4.5%) for Secretary of State; and Winston Sephus, Jr. received 57,326 votes (2.8%) for State Treasurer. All three totals surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to retain its statewide ballot status for four years.


2008: The Wisconsin Green Party failed to extend statewide ballot status in November 2008

IIn Wisconsin in 2008 the criteria to retain statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% for president. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Green presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney received 4,216 votes (0.14%), less than the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to extend its statewide ballot status for two years.


2010: The Wisconsin Green Party failed to retain  for statewide ballot status in November 2008

In Wisconsin in 2010, the criteria to gain statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% in any statewide race. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

The Wisconsin Green Party did not run a statewide candidate in 2010 and therefore did not receive at least 1% in any statewide race to maintain its statewide ballot status for two years.


2012: The Wisconsin Green Party failed to qualify for statewide ballot status in November 2012

IIn Wisconsin in 2008 the criteria to qualify for statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% for president. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Green presidential candidate Jill Stein received 7,665 votes (0.25), less than the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to gain statewide ballot status for two years.


2014: The Wisconsin Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in November 2014

In Wisconsin in 2010, the criteria to gain statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% in any statewide race. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Ron Hardy received 66,120 votes (2.88%) for State Treasurer. His 2.88% surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to qualify for statewide ballot status for two years.


2016: The Wisconsin Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in November 2016

Green presidential candidate Jill Stein received 31,072 votes (1.04%), more than the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to extend its statewide ballot status for two years.


2018: The Wisconsin Green Party failed to qualify for statewide ballot status in November 2018

In Wisconsin in 2018, the criteria to gain statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% in any statewide race. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

The Wisconsin Green Party did not run a statewide candidate in 2018 and therefore did not receive at least 1% in any statewide race to maintain its statewide ballot status for two years.


2022: The Wisconsin Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in November 2022

In Wisconsin in 2022, the criteria to gain statewide ballot status was for a party to receive at least 1% in any statewide race. Unique among U.S. states, receiving at least 1% only guarantees two years of ballot status, except that a party can’t lose its ballot status in a presidential year, but only a governor year. That effectively makes receiving at least 1% in a governor year guaranteeing four years of ballot status, while in the presidential race only two years.

Green Secretary of State candidate Sharyl Mcfarland received 41,532 votes  (1.58%), more than the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to qualify for statewide ballot status for four years.