Ballot Status History – Arizona Green Party

1992: The Arizona Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in summer, 1992

The criteria in 1992 for new ballot status qualification starting with the upcoming primary elections was to achieve a number of petition signatures based equal to at least 1.33% of the number of votes cast in the state’s preceding gubernatorial election. In 1992, the Arizona Green Party (AZGP) gathered a sufficient number of signatures to qualify.


1994: The Arizona Green Party failed to retain statewide ballot status in 1994

To retain ballot status in 1994, either 0.67% of all voters needed to be registered Green by late 1993, or the AZGP needed to have received at least 5% in the previous statewide race for governor or president.

The AZGP did not have a presidential candidate in 1994 (the office of governor was not on the ballot), thus failing to meet the 5% threshold. The voter registration threshold for 1994 was at least 14,500 voters as registered party members. The AZGP failed to reach that threshold and failed to retain its ballot status.


2000: The Arizona Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in summer, 2000

The criteria in 2000 for new ballot status qualification starting with the upcoming primary elections was to achieve a number of petition signatures based equal to at least 1.33% of the number of votes cast in the state’s preceding gubernatorial election. In 2000, the AZGP gathered a sufficient number of signatures to qualify.


2000: The Arizona Green Party failed to extend statewide ballot status in in November 2000

The criteria in 2000 for extending ballot status in Arizona via a general election result was to receive at least 5% in a statewide race for governor or president.  AZGP presidential candidate Ralph Nader received 2.98% of the vote, insufficient to extend ballot status.


2008: The Arizona Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in April 2008

The criteria in 2008 for new ballot status qualification starting with the upcoming primary elections is to achieve a number of petition signatures based equal to at least 1.33% of the number of votes cast in the state’s preceding gubernatorial election. On March 6, 2008 the AZGP turned in 29,300 signatures, and a sufficient number were valid to qualify the party for ballot status.


2008: The Arizona Green Party failed to extend statewide ballot status in in November 2008

The criteria in 2008 for extending ballot status in Arizona via a general election result was to receive at least 5% in a statewide race for governor or president. AZGP presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney received 0.15% of the vote, insufficient to extend ballot status.

The ballot status the AZGP achieved in the summer of 2008 lasted until November 2009, by which time the AZGP needed to have 0.67% of registered voters  to retain its status, which in did not have at that point, needing 20,773 registered voters and having 4,216.


2010: The Arizona Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in March 2010

The criteria in 2010 for new ballot status qualification starting with the upcoming primary elections was to achieve a number of petition signatures based equal to at least 1.33% of the number of votes cast in the state’s preceding gubernatorial election. In 2010, that number of petition signatures was 20,449. On March 11th, 2010 the AZGP turned in 29,015 signatures, and a sufficient number were valid to qualify the party for ballot status.

Owing to a 2010 amendment in state law, this qualification became valid for four years, instead of two, giving the AZGP ballot status until 2014.

This followed a February 2010 lawsuit victory, in which Federal Court Judge Susan Bolton ruled to prohibit the Arizona Secretary of State from refusing petitions circulated by non-resident supporters of the AZGP. At the same time, she restored the March 11 deadline, voiding an earlier published February 25 substitute, as the State of Arizona had changed the date for the primaries in the middle of the election cycle. The lawsuit Green Party v Bennett, was originally filed on November 18th, 2009.


2014: The Arizona Green Party failed to extend statewide ballot status in 2014

The criteria in 2014 for extending ballot status in Arizona via a general election result was to receive at least 5% in a statewide race for governor or president. The AZGP did not field a governor candidate in November 2014, hence insufficient to extend ballot status.


2016: The Arizona Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in December 2014

The criteria in 2016 for new party ballot status qualification starting with the upcoming primary elections was to achieve a number of petition signatures based equal to at least 1.33% of the number of votes cast in the state’s preceding gubernatorial election.

The number of signatures required for 2016 was 23,041.  The AZGP submitted 30,677 signatures, of which the Secretary of State determined 25,591 were valid, qualifying the AZGP for the 2016 and 2018 primary and general election ballots.


2018: The Arizona Green Party failed to extend statewide ballot status in 2018

The criteria in 2018 for extending ballot status in Arizona via a general election result was to receive at least 5% in a statewide race for governor or president.  In November 2018 elections, AZGP governor candidate Angel Torres received 50,962 votes (2.14%), insufficient to meet the 5% threshold to extend ballot status for four more years.


2020: The Arizona Green Party failed to retain statewide ballot status in 2020

To retain ballot status in 2020, either 0.67% of all voters need to be registered Green by December 1, 2019, or the AZGP needed to receive at least 5% in a statewide race for governor or president. (Arizona Revised Statutes Title 16. Elections and Electors § 16-804. Continued representation on basis of votes cast at last preceding general election or registered electors).

Based upon then-existing law, the 2020 deadline was supposed to be February To retain ballot status in Arizona, either 0.67% of all voters need to be As of October 1, 2019, there were 6,405 (0.17%) registered Greens in Arizona, insufficient to meet the 0.67% threshold to retain ballot status for 2020.

In the November 2018 elections, AZGP governor candidate Angel Torres received 50,962 votes (2.14%), insufficient to meet the 5% threshold to extend ballot status at that time.


2020: The Arizona Green Party failed to regain statewide ballot status in 2020

The criteria in 2020 for new party ballot status qualification starting with the upcoming primary elections was to achieve a number of petition signatures based equal to at least 1.33% of the number of votes cast in the state’s preceding gubernatorial election. (Arizona Revised Statutes Title 16. Elections and Electors § 16-801. Representation of new party on ballot at primary and general elections).

The number of signatures required for 2020 was 31,686 – the highest ever required for new parties in Arizona, owing to high voter turnout in November 2018 and the overall growth in the number of registered voters.

Based upon then-existing law, the 2020 deadline was supposed to be February 28, 2020. However in 2019, the state legislature approved SB1154 (David Gowan, R-Sierra Vista), moving up the deadline 70 days to November 28, 2020. The AZGP failed to gather a sufficient number of signatures by this date to qualify for 2020 elections.


2024: The Arizona Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in December 2023

The criteria in 2024 for new party ballot status qualification starting with the upcoming primary elections was to achieve a number of petition signatures based equal to at least 1.33% of the number of votes cast in the state’s preceding gubernatorial election.

The number of signatures required for 2020 was 34,127 – the highest ever required for new parties in Arizona.  The AZGP submitted over 63,000 signatures, of which the Secretary of State determined 45,127 were valid, qualifying the AZGP for the 2024 and 2026 primary and general election ballots.